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Toronto Public Library - Bloor/Gladstone Branch, 1101 Bloor Street West Toronto, Ontario  
Dec 08, 2017 | 6:00 pm

Nimmikaage (She Dances for People) (2015 | 3 min), by Michelle Latimer

Both a requiem for and an honouring of Canada’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit women, this short film deconstructs the layers of Canadian nationalism. In the process, it reverses the colonial lens by shifting the balance of power to reclaim the Canadian narrative, putting the enduring strength and resilience of Indigenous women at the forefront.

Christmas at Moose Factory (1971 | 13 min), by Alanis Obomsawin

This short animation by acclaimed Abenaki filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin creates a charming study of life at Christmas time in Moose Factory, an old settlement mainly composed of Indigenous families on the shore of James Bay. Composed entirely of children’s crayon drawings and narrated by a little girl, the film illustrates incidents big and small with childish candor, conveying to the viewer a strong sense of being there.

Mohawk Girls (2005 | 1 h 2 min), by Tracy Deer

Shot over two years, Mohawk Girls provides a surprising inside look at modern Indigenous youth culture. Deeply emotional yet unsentimental, it reveals the hope, despair, heartache and promise of growing up Indigenous at the beginning of the 21st century.

In collaboration with CCUNESCO. More information here.

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