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First Nations Garden, Botanical Garden, 4101 Sherbrooke Street East Montreal, Quebec  
Aug 13, 2017 | 10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Admission fees may apply to access site.

Souvenir

Series of four films by First Nations filmmakers that remix archival footage to address Indigenous identity and representation, reframing Canadian history through a contemporary lens.

Etlinisigu’niet (Bleed Down) (2015 | 5 min), by Jeff Barnaby

Jeff Barnaby’s Etlinisigu’niet (Bleed Down) destroys any remaining shreds of the mythology of a fair and just Canada. His message is clear: attempts to “get rid of the Indian problem” have failed. Featuring music by Tanya Tagaq.

Mobilize (2015 | 3 min), by Caroline Monnet

This short film, crafted entirely out of NFB archival footage by First Nations filmmaker Caroline Monnet, takes us on an exhilarating journey from the Far North to the urban south, capturing the perpetual negotiation between the traditional and the modern by a people moving ever forward.

Nimmikaage (She Dances for People) (2015 | 3 min), by Michelle Latimer

Both a requiem for and an honouring of Canada’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit women, this short film deconstructs the layers of Canadian nationalism. In the process, it reverses the colonial lens by shifting the balance of power to reclaim the Canadian narrative, putting the enduring strength and resilience of Indigenous women at the forefront.

Sisters & Brothers (2015 | 3 min), by Kent Monkman

In a pounding critique of Canada’s colonial history, this short film draws parallels between the annihilation of the bison in the 1890s and the devastation inflicted on the Indigenous population by the residential school system.

Each screening of the Souvenir series will be followed by the short documentary Si le temps le permet by Elisapie Isaac (27 min) as well as its English version, If the Weather Permits.

If the Weather Permits (2003 | 27 min), by Elisapie Isaac

This short documentary studies life in the village of Kangirsujuaq, in Nunavik. In this community lying on the edge of the Arctic Ocean, children’s laughter fills the streets while the old people ponder the passage of time. They are nomads of the wide-open spaces who are trying to get used to the strange feeling of staying put. Here, teenagers lap up “southern” culture and, to kill time, play golf on the tundra. Here, the elders are slowly dying, while their entire culture seems to be fading away.

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