University of Windsor, Ed Lumely Engineering Building, Room 1100, 2285 Wyandotte Street West Windsor, Ontario  
Feb 15, 2018 | 7:00 pm

Souvenir

Series of four films by First Nations filmmakers that remix archival footage to address Indigenous identity and representation, reframing Canadian history through a contemporary lens.

Etlinisigu’niet (Bleed Down) (2015 | 5 min), by Jeff Barnaby

Jeff Barnaby’s Etlinisigu’niet (Bleed Down) destroys any remaining shreds of the mythology of a fair and just Canada. His message is clear: attempts to “get rid of the Indian problem” have failed. Featuring music by Tanya Tagaq.

Mobilize (2015 | 3 min), by Caroline Monnet

This short film, crafted entirely out of NFB archival footage by First Nations filmmaker Caroline Monnet, takes us on an exhilarating journey from the Far North to the urban south, capturing the perpetual negotiation between the traditional and the modern by a people moving ever forward.

Nimmikaage (She Dances for People) (2015 | 3 min), by Michelle Latimer

Both a requiem for and an honouring of Canada’s First Nations, Métis and Inuit women, this short film deconstructs the layers of Canadian nationalism. In the process, it reverses the colonial lens by shifting the balance of power to reclaim the Canadian narrative, putting the enduring strength and resilience of Indigenous women at the forefront.

Sisters & Brothers (2015 | 3 min), by Kent Monkman

In a pounding critique of Canada’s colonial history, this short film draws parallels between the annihilation of the bison in the 1890s and the devastation inflicted on the Indigenous population by the residential school system.

How People Got Fire (2008 | 16 min), by Daniel Janke

This introspective short animation takes place In the village of Carcross, in the Tagish First Nation. Neighbourhood pillar Grandma Kay tell the local children the tale of how Crow brought fire to people. As the story unfolds, we also meet 12-year-old Tish, an introspective, talented girl who feels drawn to the elder. Here, past and present blend, myth and reality meet, and the metaphor of fire infuses all in a location that lies at the heart of this Native community’s spiritual and cultural memory.

This River (2016 | 19 min), by Erika MacPherson and Katherena Vermette

This short documentary offers an Indigenous perspective on the devastating experience of searching for a loved one who has disappeared. Volunteer activist Kyle Kematch and award-winning writer Katherena Vermette have both survived this heartbreak, and share their histories with each other and the audience. While their stories are different, they both exemplify the beauty, grace, resilience, and activism born out of the need to do something.

Presented by University of Windsor Aboriginal Education Centre and Arts Council Windsor & Region. More information here

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